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The Ghost of Elvis Presley Is Seen Often At Graceland…

Elvis’s ghost still haunting Graceland? A hunka hunka burning ghost love baby. Picture from Jim Jarmusch’s Mystery Train about Elvis’s ghost baby.

Elvis reached the top of the country charts with “Mystery Train” in 1955. His first number one song on the so-called “Hot 100” was “Heartbreak Hotel” (1956), which held that position for seven of the twenty-seven weeks it was on the chart. This song also reached the top of the country charts, and it became a symbol of his ability to combine country singing with rhythm-and-blues, as well as with the new rage that had grown out of rhythm-and-blues: rock ‘n’ roll. The rest of the 1950s brought Elvis “living legend” status with records that included “Hound Dog” (1956), “Don’t Be Cruel” (1956), “Blue Suede Shoes” (1956), “Love Me Tender” (1956), “All Shook Up” (1957), and “Jailhouse Rock” (1957). He started the 1960s in similar fashion with “It’s Now or Never” (1960) and “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” (1960).

Elvis was universally dubbed the “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll” and led the new music from its beginnings in the 1950s to its peak in the 1960s and on to its permanent place in the music of the 1970s and the 1980s. His impact on American popular culture was tremendous, as he seemed to affect manner of dress, hairstyles, and even behavior. John Lennon (1940–1980) would later note Elvis as one of the most important influences on the Beatles. Even his spinning hip movements became legendary as he continued his rock ‘n’ roll conquest to the extent of 136 gold records (500,000 sold) and 10 platinum records (1 million sold). Ultimately he had the most records to make the rating charts and was the top recording artist for two straight decades, the 1950s and the 1960s.

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